Tag Archives: ice wine

Riesling in Russia!

Hi you Riesling fans,

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It’s been a while, because I started studying for the WSET Diploma Spirits exam.
Which, is coming up very soon…

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I did taste something unusual, simply fun.
Riesling Mate Winter, which is a Riesling wine infused with spices like ginger, star anise, cinnamon and a lot more.
To me, it’s like an unfortified vermouth, refreshing, tasty and not very sweet.
It is red colored which initially threw me off, but it’s quite nice!
I purchased it from a crowd funding Called Mari Mate join the Lama.
http://www.jointhelama.com/en/start/

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Likewise, I shared the drinks business Riesling Masters article on my fb page:
https://www.facebook.com/Riessearching/

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But the theme of today, Riesling in Russia.

Overall in Russia there are a lot of wines made from imported grapes who are low to mid priced. But the premium let’s call them home made, wines are wining space!
But still only 20% of the wines produced from grapes grown in Russia are sold in Russia.
The wine growing regions in Russia have a moderate continental climate with severe winters. In regions like Rostov and Stravopol the vines need to be banked with sand against lethal frost bite in winter.
Krasnodar is one of the southern regions and the most important wine region in Russia. Takes in a quite long autumn where grapes can ripen fairly. So also Riesling ripens quite well. Here in the soil is an honest amount of chalk and marl.

Likewise, there’s some ice wine made from Riesling in Russia.
But overall I can’t find tasting notes from 100% Riesling only ice wines.
I will taste some on prowein if there is, but I think there will be and I will discuss it when I did taste some.

What is also, I have not yet discovered a Russian wine in Belgium and I don’t think there is a lot imported or really a market for it right now.

Enjoy reading and I’ll see you the next RIESsearchING!

Sources:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sponsored/rbth/10023097/russia-wine-expert-view.html
Jancis Robinson.com and the Oxford companion